Secrets Of Applying For A Virtual Assistant Job

One of the fastest growing career fields in the past 3 years is virtual assisting. Gone are the days when your assistant would be in an office next to yours, or cramped in a corner of the office you’re forced to share. With this growth, we’ve seen tremendous growth in the demand for these jobs, especially since it allows for the freedom of being anywhere globally and still being able to do what’s expected by your employer. I hired my first virtual assistant about 5 years ago and not only have I saved considerable money from not having the overhead costs associated with having an office for her, but I simply could not function without here today.

With the high demand for these positions, it seems the scammers are up to their old tricks and are feverishly targeting these job seekers. With that in mind, you need to plan your strategy very thoughtfully when conducting a job search for a virtual assistant position.

Here are a few things to consider so you don’t fall prey to scams and to stand out to the prospective legitimate employers:


* If you come across a position you feel you qualify for and would like to apply to, do some research on that company. Type in their name into google or check out the BBB to see if anything negative was ever posted about them. The way information spreads online, you’re sure to find something if there’s some negativity.

* If the job sounds too good to be true, go with your instinct and stay far away. Scammers usually hype up their job posting making it sound very simple, with tons of rewards and financial gain.

* If you’re asked to submit any fees or if the job involves you processing orders or acting as a bank agent for said company… really do your research. We’ve seen many people scammed this way and even get into legal difficulties as well. Remember, no employer will ask you to pay them to apply for their vacant job.

* When you apply, pay attention to if it’s a company email address or one of those free accounts, how soon after you receive a response and what’s in the response. If they ask for personal information like your credit card number, social security number, banking info, etc… treat that as a red flag and be warned that this is a scam.

* Highlight your best skills. This would show that you have a specialty, and would be much better than over-selling yourself as a person who can do everything. Read the job ad a few times to determine what the employer is looking for. Then focus on those areas in your application. Employers don’t have time to dig through to find what they’re looking for, so make it easy for them to find.

* When using job boards you should only sign up with one account to access data base of vacant job posting. Doing any differently could get you banned and prevent you from doing future job searches to find the latest available jobs. Familiar yourself with the rules and try to  follow them.

* As you post a job seeking profile make sure you check it over very carefully. Your spelling and grammar on your resume should be impeccable. You should also be very organized and be creative yet professional when describing your skills and qualifications.

* Always follow the instructions of the potential employer that’s stated in the job description. If they ask that you put certain text in the subject of the application email, do so. They could be testing to see how well you can follow instructions. It will save you from being removed from contention for the job.

With more employers seeing the true cost saving benefits of hiring virtual assistants, we’re positive that there will be more vacant positions being posted and a greater demand for those jobs. i hope the tips provided above will help you in your job search.

About Chris
With over 11 years experience helping 1000's of job seekers secure jobs they're now gainfully employed at, Chris is known throughout the industry as a career coach who genuinely cares about helping the unemployed. As leader of a team of international telecommuters he manages a network of websites within the career coaching industry, which gets over 100,000 monthly visitors and he's in direct contact though his career coaching newsletter, with over 30,000 job seekers.

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